My Suitemates Made Me Do It

Your awesome Tagline

64,541 notes

adhoption:

200metres:

logiciskawaii:

bathsabbath:

piscula:

skooth:

bhavatarini:

myblacksexuality:

poetofwar333:

#cleopatra with the nose knocked off. I wonder if people still think she was European like the movies betray…

I still think it’s one of the most desperate things whites have done to blacks and to black history. The disrespect is outrageous. They came to our country and mentally could not fathom how these black civilizations could be so great. They literally rode through our lands and shot the noses off of our statues. Why? So that the statues would no longer resemble the African people and they could LIE about the origins of Egypt and countless other civilizations. It was a widespread practice. It’s why statues of Pharaoh’s and their wives have no noses. It’s why the Sphinx has no nose. When I was in middle and high school, we were taught that the noses had fell off due to time and poor craftsmanship! They have literally tried to teach us that our ancestors were shitty builders of noses just to hide their malicious destruction of our heritage. European fears of African peoples had to come from somewhere. I want to know what part of the history is missing. There’s something that they don’t want to be told.

The shade is real

i was taught that the noses fell off as well and actually continued to believe this. in retrospect this makes no sense, considering greek/roman statues pretty much always have intact noses whereas egyptian ones are always conveniently missing theirs. thank you for pointing this out to me, i hadn’t even made that connection until now.

The bolded was me too and I am seriously embarrassed that I never even thought about how that could be false.

Damnnn. I hate myself for not realizing this.
    I hate myself even more, since I know the ancient Egyptians created their sculptural works with the idea of permanence in mind. They were literally built to last throughout the afterlife. Notice how the majority of their monumental sculpture is stone-bound, without any protruding elements or breakable appendages. That’s because many of these sculptures were intended to house the life-force (Ka) of those they portrayed. Of their favorite materials were basalt and diorite, both extremely hard stones that were incredibly difficult to carve. Meaning a nose just doesn’t “fall off” because of “poor craftsmanship,” you would literally have to take a hammer to it. Fuckers.

even though it’s highly likely many of these statues were vandalised (racists gonna racist and all that), i’m suspicious of some of the reasoning presented above.
not every statue was a ka statue, and even so ka statues were built from dynasty iv (2680-2565 bc) onward. that is a very long time ago, especially when you consider that ancient rome was founded in 753 bc, and ancient greece ~800 bc. europe was going through the bronze age for all but a few centuries of ancient egyptian civilization.
also, ka statues were sometimes built from wood (specifically acacia and sycamore). not entirely relevant, but good to know nonetheless. oh, and as ka statues were designed to hold the spirit of a deceased person, the opening of the mouth ceremony was performed on them in order for them to perceive the world. i can’t remember where i heard this but it was sometimes believed that others would sabotage these statues as a big “fuck you” to the spirit within.
although the igneous rock of most ka statues is generally resistant to weathering, many other materials were used for sculpture. limestone (including alabaster), sandstone, copper, mud, ebony, ivory, iron, gold and silver, to be exact. how well do you think sedimentary sculptures are going to fare against thousands of years of weathering in a country with annual sandstorms? if the sphinx hadn’t had its nose hammered off (potentially during the muslim iconoclast of egypt for religious rather than racial reasons), how do you think the nose of this (at least) 4500-year-old statue would look?
it doesn’t matter if a statue was built out of separate parts or not - the nose will still be a structural weak point, and as such if a statue were to fall or be hit then the nose would be the first thing to go. also, accidents do happen over the course of thousands of years, and not just to noses.
many ancient roman and greek statues also have broken noses, by the way, despite also being made of igneous rock.
also, compared to the sculptures missing noses there are shitloads still bearing them. and noses aren’t the only facial feature that varies between races - for example, white people generally have thinner lips. compare and contrast. even though the statue of ramses ii is missing his nose, it’s still fairly easy to guess his race.
plus cleopatra viii philopator was the last pharaoh of the ptolemaic dynasty, a royal family of macedonian greek ancestry. upon alexander the great’s death in 323 bc, one of his bodyguards (ptolemy) was appointed satrap (governor) of egypt and declared himself king in 305 bc. here are some ptolemiac pharaohs, and here’s cleopatra, whose death in 30 bc marked the end of the ancient egyptian dynasties (oh and here’s her son). the ptolemaic dynasty is ~300 years, at the end of a civilisation which spanned 3000.
there isn’t some great nose-smashing conspiracy perpetrated by evil whitey. the fact that out of at least 332 pharaohs the one people generally learn the most about in school is one of the 19 non-native ones is laughable (and that some people think the second-most well-known pharaoh, tutankhamun, was white because he might have had red hair is also ridiculous) and definitely evidence of how eurocentric history lessons can be, but the solution to this is not to lie about cleopatra’s race but instead to find a way to ensure the 2700 rich, vibrant years of black egyptian civilisation are given their fair share of attention. there’s enough racism to tackle here without inventing more.

Cleopatra was definitely Greek/Macedonian, from a foreign family who mostly even refused to learn the Egyptian language, but even if she was Egyptian a few points here wouldn’t make sense. Sure, Egypt is in Africa, but that doesn’t mean that they would all have stereotypical African features and the same colour skin. Africans are not one homogeneous group; you’re talking about an entire continent, and it’s been estimated that there is more genetic diversity in Africa than in the rest of the world combined.
Most Egyptians have much lighter skin than sub-Saharan Africans, for example. Noting “Egypt is in Africa” as evidence is like assuming a Russian, an Indian, and an Iranian must all look Chinese because their countries are in Asia. Africa is a big place, and Egypt is right on the edge of it (you know, with other Arabic countries).
Moving on from the geography lesson, we can start on some history. The sphinx was built before 2500 BC, whilst the Roman empire peaked around 100 AD. Roman statues have survived more because they are a hell of a lot younger than Egyptian ones, whilst Rome has also been invaded less frequently. It’s not some systematic nose genocide, it’s basic wear and tear over a much longer period. Many prominent Egyptian statues survived, by the way, supporting the idea that this one lost its nose accidentally. The nose is often the most fragile part of a statue, so that’s hardly a surprise.
It’s funny what dates can tell you. People have been claiming that Napoleon’s soldiers rode through and broke all of the noses, including the Sphinx. However, sketches of the Sphinx in 1738 show the nose already missing, but Napoleon wasn’t born until 1769. The same story has then been re-told about a hundred different armies, none with any evidence (despite these cultures keeping meticulous records), making it a pretty clear urban myth.
History books from the 15th Century, however, record that a man called Muhammad Sa’im al-Dahr removed the nose as religiously-motivated iconoclasm. Many Egyptians felt that worshipping these statues as idols disrespected the real gods, and so stopped the idols from representing them. Absolutely nothing to do with race.
Finally, please note that this statue is being removed from the ocean. Cleopatra’s palace fell into the sea after being destroyed by an earthquake, and has been lying there for 1,500 years. They were built another 500 years before then, and had spent a lot of that time derelict as Cleopatra’s regime collapsed with her suicide. I don’t have to be saying that statues have “poor craftsmanship” or aren’t “built to last” to think that a nose might just have been knocked off or eroded along the way. An earthquake and a drop into the harbour are a lot more powerful than a hammer blow.
Beautifully, the remains have only been found recently (hence the photograph), having disappeared into the sea thousands of years ago. When do you think Napoleon’s forces, or the British army, invaded? Do you think it was before or after 365 BC? It seems that this statue has most likely been sitting happily underwater during every single Western invasion of Egypt, and has only been rescued after they have past, so unless you are suggesting troops rode along the sea bed and shot noses off you are completely lost.

Why do people love to jump on a bandwagon without thinking.

adhoption:

200metres:

logiciskawaii:

bathsabbath:

piscula:

skooth:

bhavatarini:

myblacksexuality:

poetofwar333:

#cleopatra with the nose knocked off. I wonder if people still think she was European like the movies betray…

I still think it’s one of the most desperate things whites have done to blacks and to black history. The disrespect is outrageous. They came to our country and mentally could not fathom how these black civilizations could be so great. They literally rode through our lands and shot the noses off of our statues. Why? So that the statues would no longer resemble the African people and they could LIE about the origins of Egypt and countless other civilizations. It was a widespread practice. It’s why statues of Pharaoh’s and their wives have no noses. It’s why the Sphinx has no nose. When I was in middle and high school, we were taught that the noses had fell off due to time and poor craftsmanship! They have literally tried to teach us that our ancestors were shitty builders of noses just to hide their malicious destruction of our heritage. European fears of African peoples had to come from somewhere. I want to know what part of the history is missing. There’s something that they don’t want to be told.

The shade is real

i was taught that the noses fell off as well and actually continued to believe this. in retrospect this makes no sense, considering greek/roman statues pretty much always have intact noses whereas egyptian ones are always conveniently missing theirs. thank you for pointing this out to me, i hadn’t even made that connection until now.

The bolded was me too and I am seriously embarrassed that I never even thought about how that could be false.

Damnnn. I hate myself for not realizing this.

    I hate myself even more, since I know the ancient Egyptians created their sculptural works with the idea of permanence in mind. They were literally built to last throughout the afterlife. Notice how the majority of their monumental sculpture is stone-bound, without any protruding elements or breakable appendages. That’s because many of these sculptures were intended to house the life-force (Ka) of those they portrayed. Of their favorite materials were basalt and diorite, both extremely hard stones that were incredibly difficult to carve. Meaning a nose just doesn’t “fall off” because of “poor craftsmanship,” you would literally have to take a hammer to it. Fuckers.

even though it’s highly likely many of these statues were vandalised (racists gonna racist and all that), i’m suspicious of some of the reasoning presented above.

not every statue was a ka statue, and even so ka statues were built from dynasty iv (2680-2565 bc) onward. that is a very long time ago, especially when you consider that ancient rome was founded in 753 bc, and ancient greece ~800 bc. europe was going through the bronze age for all but a few centuries of ancient egyptian civilization.

also, ka statues were sometimes built from wood (specifically acacia and sycamore). not entirely relevant, but good to know nonetheless. oh, and as ka statues were designed to hold the spirit of a deceased person, the opening of the mouth ceremony was performed on them in order for them to perceive the world. i can’t remember where i heard this but it was sometimes believed that others would sabotage these statues as a big “fuck you” to the spirit within.

although the igneous rock of most ka statues is generally resistant to weathering, many other materials were used for sculpture. limestone (including alabaster), sandstonecopper, mud, ebony, ivory, iron, gold and silver, to be exact. how well do you think sedimentary sculptures are going to fare against thousands of years of weathering in a country with annual sandstorms? if the sphinx hadn’t had its nose hammered off (potentially during the muslim iconoclast of egypt for religious rather than racial reasons), how do you think the nose of this (at least) 4500-year-old statue would look?

it doesn’t matter if a statue was built out of separate parts or not - the nose will still be a structural weak point, and as such if a statue were to fall or be hit then the nose would be the first thing to go. also, accidents do happen over the course of thousands of years, and not just to noses.

many ancient roman and greek statues also have broken noses, by the way, despite also being made of igneous rock.

also, compared to the sculptures missing noses there are shitloads still bearing them. and noses aren’t the only facial feature that varies between races - for example, white people generally have thinner lips. compare and contrast. even though the statue of ramses ii is missing his nose, it’s still fairly easy to guess his race.

plus cleopatra viii philopator was the last pharaoh of the ptolemaic dynasty, a royal family of macedonian greek ancestry. upon alexander the great’s death in 323 bc, one of his bodyguards (ptolemy) was appointed satrap (governor) of egypt and declared himself king in 305 bc. here are some ptolemiac pharaohs, and here’s cleopatra, whose death in 30 bc marked the end of the ancient egyptian dynasties (oh and here’s her son). the ptolemaic dynasty is ~300 years, at the end of a civilisation which spanned 3000.

there isn’t some great nose-smashing conspiracy perpetrated by evil whitey. the fact that out of at least 332 pharaohs the one people generally learn the most about in school is one of the 19 non-native ones is laughable (and that some people think the second-most well-known pharaoh, tutankhamun, was white because he might have had red hair is also ridiculous) and definitely evidence of how eurocentric history lessons can be, but the solution to this is not to lie about cleopatra’s race but instead to find a way to ensure the 2700 rich, vibrant years of black egyptian civilisation are given their fair share of attention. there’s enough racism to tackle here without inventing more.

Cleopatra was definitely Greek/Macedonian, from a foreign family who mostly even refused to learn the Egyptian language, but even if she was Egyptian a few points here wouldn’t make sense. Sure, Egypt is in Africa, but that doesn’t mean that they would all have stereotypical African features and the same colour skin. Africans are not one homogeneous group; you’re talking about an entire continent, and it’s been estimated that there is more genetic diversity in Africa than in the rest of the world combined.

Most Egyptians have much lighter skin than sub-Saharan Africans, for example. Noting “Egypt is in Africa” as evidence is like assuming a Russian, an Indian, and an Iranian must all look Chinese because their countries are in Asia. Africa is a big place, and Egypt is right on the edge of it (you know, with other Arabic countries).

Moving on from the geography lesson, we can start on some history. The sphinx was built before 2500 BC, whilst the Roman empire peaked around 100 AD. Roman statues have survived more because they are a hell of a lot younger than Egyptian ones, whilst Rome has also been invaded less frequently. It’s not some systematic nose genocide, it’s basic wear and tear over a much longer period. Many prominent Egyptian statues survived, by the way, supporting the idea that this one lost its nose accidentally. The nose is often the most fragile part of a statue, so that’s hardly a surprise.

It’s funny what dates can tell you. People have been claiming that Napoleon’s soldiers rode through and broke all of the noses, including the Sphinx. However, sketches of the Sphinx in 1738 show the nose already missing, but Napoleon wasn’t born until 1769. The same story has then been re-told about a hundred different armies, none with any evidence (despite these cultures keeping meticulous records), making it a pretty clear urban myth.

History books from the 15th Century, however, record that a man called Muhammad Sa’im al-Dahr removed the nose as religiously-motivated iconoclasm. Many Egyptians felt that worshipping these statues as idols disrespected the real gods, and so stopped the idols from representing them. Absolutely nothing to do with race.

Finally, please note that this statue is being removed from the ocean. Cleopatra’s palace fell into the sea after being destroyed by an earthquake, and has been lying there for 1,500 years. They were built another 500 years before then, and had spent a lot of that time derelict as Cleopatra’s regime collapsed with her suicide. I don’t have to be saying that statues have “poor craftsmanship” or aren’t “built to last” to think that a nose might just have been knocked off or eroded along the way. An earthquake and a drop into the harbour are a lot more powerful than a hammer blow.

Beautifully, the remains have only been found recently (hence the photograph), having disappeared into the sea thousands of years ago. When do you think Napoleon’s forces, or the British army, invaded? Do you think it was before or after 365 BC? It seems that this statue has most likely been sitting happily underwater during every single Western invasion of Egypt, and has only been rescued after they have past, so unless you are suggesting troops rode along the sea bed and shot noses off you are completely lost.

Why do people love to jump on a bandwagon without thinking.

(via nefariousnlck)

Filed under history art history

36,308 notes

Why does the man behind 'Doctor Who' and 'Sherlock' still have a job?

bookshop:

smaugy-poo:

viewovermerryton:

stopitsgingertime:

this article is so so important please read it

holy shit, though. wow.

OH.MY.GOD. it has EVERY QUOTE. WITH A LINK. this article must’ve been burning in this writer’s mind for ages…well done.

True story: when I initially pitched this article, my editor thought I was joking and squelched it, and I went back and screamed at him a lot until he understood there is NOTHING FUNNY ABOUT THE RAGE-INDUCING EFFECTS OF STEVEN MOFFAT and let me write it, haha.

(Also, since a lot of people have been questioning the veracity of the quotes, I just want to say that everything in “” in the article is a word-for-word quote that comes from either a video/radio or print interview by Moffat, or a tweet from his now-deleted twitter, or a line one of his characters says. Every other link is tied to arguments about the narratives of his series, so yes, it’s all as verified as we could possibly make it.)

(via nefariousnlck)

Filed under And people wonder why I say I hate Doctor Who now.... don't you think he looks tired

180,664 notes

hannibalson:

super-wholock-avengers:

the-dementor-in-the-tardis:

ichiruki4evs:

shipperqueen93:

thestraggletag:

Now You See Me Opening Scene

BUT THAT WAS ACTUALLY THE CARD WE ALL PICKED RIGHT

HOW DID THEY DO THAT

HOLY. FUCKING. SHIT.

I’m done, internet. Just… done.


I just showed this to my best friend and she flipped her shit. “HOW DID HE KNOW THAT WAS THE CARD!!”

but how

Not sure if this is true, but apparently they stack a few of the same card (7 diamonds) one after another to ensure that when he does the thing you’ll definitely see it and it will be the most pronounced one to you so you’ll choose it 

7 diamonds is the only one that is cearly seen. you couldnt have chosen any other card because you havent seen any, they were shown too fast to actually see the details on them and read the number or suit. pretty easy.
but when you watch this scene for the first time it is really impressing.

There was definitely more than one 7 of diamonds. If you watch the third gif a couple of times, you see a 7 of diamonds, a face card, and then the really pronounced 7 of diamonds.

(Source: rooneymara, via thatweirdkiddyouknow)

Filed under now you see me I'm kinda interested in this movie but I haven't seen it yet

34,178 notes

burningupasun:

eastofgallifrey:

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

Guys, really, you should click the link. 

“Ironically, the woman who is often propped up as proof that Steven Moffat is, in fact, not a sexist was one of the worst in terms of the Bechdel test and overall independence of thought and character. While maintaining an average speaking time, the episodes she is in only pass the Bechdel Test 57% of the time, and she herself only passes 42% of the time. She also never passes it on her own after Series 5. It is also important to note that River’s “passes” barely scraped by this test. Her passing conversations were always around three or four lines of exchange total, limited to one per episode, and were always in the presence of/with the Doctor.”

burningupasun:

eastofgallifrey:

itsfuckingdistractingohgood:

eastofgallifrey:

University Study on Sexism in Doctor Who

"Fun fact, Rose’s Bechdal test score would have been in the 80′s were it not for the episodes Moffat wrote during her run."

Guys, really, you should click the link. 

Ironically, the woman who is often propped up as proof that Steven Moffat is, in fact, not a sexist was one of the worst in terms of the Bechdel test and overall independence of thought and character. While maintaining an average speaking time, the episodes she is in only pass the Bechdel Test 57% of the time, and she herself only passes 42% of the time. She also never passes it on her own after Series 5. It is also important to note that River’s “passes” barely scraped by this test. Her passing conversations were always around three or four lines of exchange total, limited to one per episode, and were always in the presence of/with the Doctor.”

(via thatweirdkiddyouknow)

Filed under don't you think he looks tired so fucking tired ROSE WOULD HAVE BEEN IN THE 80S IF NOT FOR FREAKING MOFFAT